29 thoughts on “Photography 101: Architecture

    1. That is Nubble Light in York, Maine.

      I’m a little surprised you don’t know it. I didn’t think there was anyone that doesn’t, because it seems that everyone on the planet who’s ever owned a camera, or thought about owning a camera, or who’s simply walked by a store that sells cameras has taken a photo of it. Which is one reason, beautifully scenic though it may be, I don’t go there very often. 😀

        1. It is a great lighthouse, that’s for sure. The only real problem with it, from a photographers perspective, is that there are really only two or three, if that, angles to shoot it from.

          1. The most photographed lighthouse in the western hemisphere … if not even the world. I _would_ love to go there before Christmas when they have it all lit up. Even the name is cute 😀

            You’re so right about the angle. One would have to be out in a boat, and the it immediately gets more difficult…

            1. No need to go before Christmas. I’m not sure how long after they keep it lit, but you get to enjoy it with much lower crowds. One thing I’ve learned after photographing it all decked out in holiday lights is to go very late at night. 10-11 late. Otherwise I had far too many shots ruined by people pulling in and leaving their car headlights on lighting up the island.

            2. That’s what I hear. Based on a few photos I’ve seen, trying from the other side on a boat wont wort very well either. The island is a bit deceiving in that it rises high enough behind the lighthouse that all you can see is the top half of the keepers house and the light tower.

    1. Thank you very much, Alexandra. It’s a great lighthouse, though I do tend to stay away from it because it is so popular. I’m not a fan of crowds and even less of a fan of making pictures that look like everyone else’s.

    1. So close. It’s actually the mills in Dover. They look just like every other mill in every other New England town. Seems the architects lacked imagination back when these were built.

Comments and thoughtful critiques are always welcome.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s